East Coast Educational Opportunities

Heller, Helen West. Physics-Biology/Chemistry-Cosmic Ray, c. 1940. New York Public Library, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection.

Recently, three opportunities for professional development have been announced, all taking place on the east coast.

VRAF is presenting a one day Omeka workshop at Hunter CollegeExhibit, Instruct, Promote: An Introduction to Omeka for Digital Scholarship, on February 19, 9:00-4:00. The workshop will be taught by Meghan Musolff, Special Projects Librarian for Library IT, University of Michigan Library, where she has used Omeka in the creation of online exhibits. The fee for this workshop is $125 and registration is required before February 12.

The Duke University Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies will hold a symposium called Apps, Maps & Models: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies on February 22, 2016 from 8:30 to 6:30. This event is free of charge! Registration is requested. The program and speakers for the day look great.

Finally, the Summer Education Institute has been announced for 2016. It will be held at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, June 7-10. The curriculum has been updated and includes a component on digital humanities projects. The institute is a rare immersive opportunity to develop new skills or deepen existing ones. Payment must be received before June 1.

 

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Round-up for July, 2015 part two

For part two, I will admit that I’m just sharing things with you that I still have open in browser tabs, awaiting time to fully investigate, but seem promising enough to pass along.

Flowingdata.com – What is FlowingData? I’m not quite sure yet. The “About” page says, “FlowingData explores how statisticians, designers, data scientists, and others use analysis, visualization, and exploration to understand data and ourselves.” Scrolling through the site, it seems to collect a variety of visualizations dealing with everything from incarceration rates, beer, and literary road trips.

The good, the bad, and the unstructured… Open data in cultural heritage – Here is a blog post including presentation slides by Mia Ridge, cultural heritage technologist, from a colloquium called Linked Pasts.

Should I do Social Network Analysis? – Marten Düring made a cheat sheet flowchart to help you make the decision whether network analysis would be helpful in your research.

Slides and Lectures from Beyond the Digitized Slide Library workshop – Instead of a week at the beach, spend a week at home working your way through tons of valuable information from the UCLA digital art history workshop covering everything from, “What is digital art history?”, to Omeka, to visualization, and more. It is a tremendously generous resource.

Eyeo Festival – After spending a week with the UCLA content, you could probably spend another week watching presentations from the Eyeo Festival, which was new to me but just wrapped up it’s fifth year. I’ve already enjoyed this presentation about a data drawing project.

MohioMap – Totally new to me, bookmarked after I saw it mentioned on Twitter. “Mohiomap gives you a visual way to navigate through your cloud data. You can cross-reference and group your files using simple drag-and-drop tagging. And Mohiomap lets you search across several cloud storage accounts at once.”