Round-up for July, 2015 part two

For part two, I will admit that I’m just sharing things with you that I still have open in browser tabs, awaiting time to fully investigate, but seem promising enough to pass along.

Flowingdata.com – What is FlowingData? I’m not quite sure yet. The “About” page says, “FlowingData explores how statisticians, designers, data scientists, and others use analysis, visualization, and exploration to understand data and ourselves.” Scrolling through the site, it seems to collect a variety of visualizations dealing with everything from incarceration rates, beer, and literary road trips.

The good, the bad, and the unstructured… Open data in cultural heritage – Here is a blog post including presentation slides by Mia Ridge, cultural heritage technologist, from a colloquium called Linked Pasts.

Should I do Social Network Analysis? – Marten DĂĽring made a cheat sheet flowchart to help you make the decision whether network analysis would be helpful in your research.

Slides and Lectures from Beyond the Digitized Slide Library workshop – Instead of a week at the beach, spend a week at home working your way through tons of valuable information from the UCLA digital art history workshop covering everything from, “What is digital art history?”, to Omeka, to visualization, and more. It is a tremendously generous resource.

Eyeo Festival – After spending a week with the UCLA content, you could probably spend another week watching presentations from the Eyeo Festival, which was new to me but just wrapped up it’s fifth year. I’ve already enjoyed this presentation about a data drawing project.

MohioMap – Totally new to me, bookmarked after I saw it mentioned on Twitter. “Mohiomap gives you a visual way to navigate through your cloud data. You can cross-reference and group your files using simple drag-and-drop tagging. And Mohiomap lets you search across several cloud storage accounts at once.”

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Links Round-up June 15, 2015

  • The latest issue of ARTL@S Bulletin is overflowing with fantastic information about a variety of mapping and spatially-related digital art history. Articles are available for free download.
  • Students of Miriam Posner (@miriamkp on Twitter) examined the Getty Provenance Index for their capstone project in UCLA’s Digital Humanities program. Some of you may remember Getty’s Christian Huemer presenting to ARLIS2013 on his work with the GPI. The student projects and accompanying articles are really interesting and worth exploring.
  • @nypl_labs tweeted about another group of students from UC Berkeley I School who put the NYPL Menu Project through a bunch of data visualizations to great results.
  • It may not meet some definitions of digital humanities, but the case of the Rothko Harvard Murals (1963) gets a good discussion here on greg.org.