A long time ago, in a meeting room in Seattle…

Space Needle Restaurant
Rare Book Division, The New York Public Library. “The Space Needle Restaurant” New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed March 30, 2016.

It has been nearly three weeks since our joint DH SIG meeting in Seattle with our VRA colleagues. There were around 70 in attendance! Our conversation was full of ideas for supporting each other in our DH efforts, ways to communicate, and perhaps most significantly, to collaborate.

  • Guidance on preservation of DH research data and projects was identified as an area needing attention.
  • A SIG-fascilitated practicum was suggested where a group could work together on data sets using a variety of tools.
  • The NYC Digital Humanities group was suggested as a possible model for our SIG(s).
  • A DH Slack channel got many thumbs-up as a way to stay in touch.
  • Creating a knowledge base of SIG members with particular skills was also popular.
  • A list of MOOCs that offer relevant DH skills (Udacity was mentioned for programming languages) would be helpful.
  • Resources on project management would be useful. (A plug for SEI this summer which will include project management as part of the curriculum.)
  • A list of DH projects that SIG members are currently engaged in or have recently completed both to showcase our efforts and to serve as a resource.

Lastly, there was enthusiasm for ARLIS/NA DH SIG and the VRA DH SIG working together, either officially or unofficially. Duplicating efforts and splitting resources is inefficient and the meeting showed great camaraderie and interest in collaboration.

Using the communication channels we have established at this time- our blog, listserv (dh-sig [at] arlisna.org) and @arlisdhsig– let’s keep the conversations going. If you want any of these ideas prioritized or want to take the lead on something, say so! Progress on these issues will be posted here. Thanks to all of you who attended, and to those of you who didn’t but have expressed interest in our SIG. We’ve got a really healthy membership and we’re positioned to do some great work in the next year!

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Call for Proposals: How did they make that?

DHCommons Journal is asking for submissions of “procedural descriptions” of stable and publicly available digital humanities projects. For those who submit, this is a great opportunity to highlight an accomplishment and to share your experience with the field. For the rest of us, these promise to be a good source of instruction and inspiration.

Submission deadline April 1, 2016 (presumably not an April Fools joke…)

East Coast Educational Opportunities

Heller, Helen West. Physics-Biology/Chemistry-Cosmic Ray, c. 1940. New York Public Library, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection.

Recently, three opportunities for professional development have been announced, all taking place on the east coast.

VRAF is presenting a one day Omeka workshop at Hunter CollegeExhibit, Instruct, Promote: An Introduction to Omeka for Digital Scholarship, on February 19, 9:00-4:00. The workshop will be taught by Meghan Musolff, Special Projects Librarian for Library IT, University of Michigan Library, where she has used Omeka in the creation of online exhibits. The fee for this workshop is $125 and registration is required before February 12.

The Duke University Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies will hold a symposium called Apps, Maps & Models: Digital Pedagogy and Research in Art History, Archaeology & Visual Studies on February 22, 2016 from 8:30 to 6:30. This event is free of charge! Registration is requested. The program and speakers for the day look great.

Finally, the Summer Education Institute has been announced for 2016. It will be held at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, June 7-10. The curriculum has been updated and includes a component on digital humanities projects. The institute is a rare immersive opportunity to develop new skills or deepen existing ones. Payment must be received before June 1.

 

DH at ARLIS/NA and VRA Annual Conference

Washington Plaza Hotel at night, Seattle
Washington Plaza Hotel (now known as the south tower of the Westin Hotel) at night, c. 1969. University of Washington Libraries. Special Collections Division, Art Hupy Photograph Collection. via Flickr Commons

ARLIS/NA and VRA are heading to Seattle, March 8-12, 2016 for another joint annual conference. Here are the programming events that are likely to offer the most to those attendees looking to expand their digital humanities toolbox.

Links Round-up June 29, 2015

I know Monday is an odd day for a links round-up, but there were a few big things that came out recently that I wanted to be sure to share.

caa.reviews published its first essay in their new Digital Humanities and Art History coverage. Written by Field Editor Pamela Fletcher, it provides a very gentle introduction and highlights a selection of projects, most of which should be familiar to you if you’ve been keeping up. Perhaps it is a style decision, but since the essay was online and concerning online materials, I would have appreciated inline links to the described projects. That said, there are plenty of links to projects and helpful articles in the end notes. I am curious to see if, in future installments, this coverage sounds less tentative and reflects a studier embrace of the digital. (This is my own opinion. What was your impression?)

-The International Journal for Digital Art History published issue #1 online June 26, 2015. All articles are available for free download and a good place to start might be “Debating Digital Art History” by Anna Bentkowska-Kafel, who asks the question, “Am I a Digital Humanist or a Digital Art Historian or, simply, an Art Historian?” A call for articles for issue #2 has a deadline of August 15, 2015. The exciting theme is Visualizing Big Image Data.

Art History DH Summer Institutes

Following the Getty Foundation-supported summer institutes is a great way to increase your exposure to digital humanities tools, projects, and discussion. Use #doingdah15 to follow along on Twitter where posting frequency is sure to be high.

James Cuno, president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, talks about the Getty’s commitment to modernizing research and scholarship in this article from April, 2014.