Round-up for July, 2015

It’s been a few weeks since the last post and there are a lot of exciting things to cover.

MoMA on Github
One of the most exciting things that happened in July, as far as the world of art and dh is concerned, is the release of MoMA’s collection data on Github. This data is a complete representation of all accessioned works (the museum’s website only includes half of the 120,000 object collection.) MoMA’s Digital Content and Strategy Manager, Fiona Romeo, wrote on blogging platform/publisher Medium about the motivation to join the ranks of museums with open collection data. And for data and art nerds, as if the release of this information isn’t enough, there has already been an in-gallery performance of the data by the Elevator Repair Service, conceived of by MoMA artists-in-residence, The Office for Creative Research. (Watch the video clip below. Warning: the language, which all comes from the museum’s collection, is not workplace friendly at the beginning.) If you just don’t feel a thrill at the idea of a 120k row .csv document, read this blog post by Jer Thorp of The Office for Creative Research who manages to write about the data release with a real sense of beauty and inspiration.

Medium.com
You may notice that the two blog posts linked in the previous paragraph are on the blogging platform Medium. Started by Twitter founded Evan Williams, Medium is a blog and publishing platform made for writers with a minimal and clean interface and a friendly format for longer articles. As you can see, MoMA is using it, a group of leading muse-tech folks have their own publication there called Code|Words, and Dana Allen-Greil just wrote about using it from inside federal institutions. David Carr wrote about it in the New York Times in May 2014.

 

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