Finding the Right Tools

 

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In a new article in Computers in Libraries (Jan./Feb. 2017), “Top Tools for Digital Humanities Research,” Nancy K. Herther, reviews some of the best free and open source tools available today. Among those reviewed are Voyant Tools, Umigon, Prism, and Sophie. Herther also provides a list of tools arranged by function with sections for Digital Humanities Toolkits, Timeline Tools, and Data Visualization.

Another suggested resource for an in-depth look at tools is the DiRT Directory, a registry of digital research tools for scholarly use.   Entries may be viewed by function and the registry offers ways to drill down by platform, cost, license, and type of data or object.

Do you have a favorite resource for learning about new tools, or finding those that best answer a particular need?

 

 

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Round-up, first half of 2016

1893 lithograph. From Metropolitan Museum of Art – Gallery Images on archive.org.

We’re nearly at the half-way point of the year! That means I’ve got lots of links to share in this round-up.

Call for Proposals: How did they make that?

DHCommons Journal is asking for submissions of “procedural descriptions” of stable and publicly available digital humanities projects. For those who submit, this is a great opportunity to highlight an accomplishment and to share your experience with the field. For the rest of us, these promise to be a good source of instruction and inspiration.

Submission deadline April 1, 2016 (presumably not an April Fools joke…)

Round-up for July, 2015 part two

For part two, I will admit that I’m just sharing things with you that I still have open in browser tabs, awaiting time to fully investigate, but seem promising enough to pass along.

Flowingdata.com – What is FlowingData? I’m not quite sure yet. The “About” page says, “FlowingData explores how statisticians, designers, data scientists, and others use analysis, visualization, and exploration to understand data and ourselves.” Scrolling through the site, it seems to collect a variety of visualizations dealing with everything from incarceration rates, beer, and literary road trips.

The good, the bad, and the unstructured… Open data in cultural heritage – Here is a blog post including presentation slides by Mia Ridge, cultural heritage technologist, from a colloquium called Linked Pasts.

Should I do Social Network Analysis? – Marten Düring made a cheat sheet flowchart to help you make the decision whether network analysis would be helpful in your research.

Slides and Lectures from Beyond the Digitized Slide Library workshop – Instead of a week at the beach, spend a week at home working your way through tons of valuable information from the UCLA digital art history workshop covering everything from, “What is digital art history?”, to Omeka, to visualization, and more. It is a tremendously generous resource.

Eyeo Festival – After spending a week with the UCLA content, you could probably spend another week watching presentations from the Eyeo Festival, which was new to me but just wrapped up it’s fifth year. I’ve already enjoyed this presentation about a data drawing project.

MohioMap – Totally new to me, bookmarked after I saw it mentioned on Twitter. “Mohiomap gives you a visual way to navigate through your cloud data. You can cross-reference and group your files using simple drag-and-drop tagging. And Mohiomap lets you search across several cloud storage accounts at once.”

Art History DH Summer Institutes

Following the Getty Foundation-supported summer institutes is a great way to increase your exposure to digital humanities tools, projects, and discussion. Use #doingdah15 to follow along on Twitter where posting frequency is sure to be high.

James Cuno, president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, talks about the Getty’s commitment to modernizing research and scholarship in this article from April, 2014.

Getting started

There are so many resources on the internet to help you learn about digital humanities (see the Reading Lists page). This blog hopes to serve as a way finder, pointing you towards new projects and opportunities, and fostering the community of our DH SIG.

For this post, I will share a couple of my favorite resources for getting your thoughts started about digital humanities projects.

The go-to for many, myself certainly included, is Miriam Posner’s How Did They Make That? blog post from 2013. Posner, coordinator of the DH program at UCLA, breaks down some typical project types, identifies what made them possible, and what you need to know. The post spawned a Zotero library and even a video (a master class in DH, if you will).

Another great read that will give you a less technical overview of the big picture of taking on DH projects is Page Morgan’s How to Get a Digital Humanities Project Off the Ground. Morgan gives clear, useful advice that comes from experience.